Pumpkin Cookies with brown-butter icing

pumpkin cookies

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This is one of those cookies that you can’t eat just one.  Pumpkin Cookies with brown-butter icing is a favorite fall cookie for our family.  They are soft and tender with a nice balance of cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg spices mixed in.  Each cookie is topped with a layer of sweet browned butter icing. I discovered this recipe about ten years ago in a Martha Stewart Living magazine. Over the years I have changed and adapted the recipe just the slightest to suite my taste.

pumpkin cookies

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pumpkin cookies

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pumpkin cookies

· print recipe ·

makes about 5 dozen

Ingredients:  for the cookies
3      cups all-purpose flour
1      teaspoon baking powder
1      teaspoon baking soda
1¼  teaspoons salt
1½  teaspoons ground cinnamon
½    teaspoon ground ginger
¼    teaspoon ground nutmeg
¾    cup unsalted butter, softened
2¼  cups packed dark-brown sugar
2      large eggs
1½  cups canned solid-pack pumpkin {15 oz}
¾    cup evaporated milk
1      teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Ingredients:  for the icing
3     cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
8    tablespoons unsalted butter
¼  cup evaporated milk, plus more if needed
1    teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 375º F.

Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg in a medium bowl, and set aside.

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pumpkin cookies

1.  Put butter and brown sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment.  Mix on medium speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 minutes.

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pumpkin cookies

2. Mix in eggs.

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pumpkin cookies

3. Reduce speed to low.  Add pumpkin.

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pumpkin cookies

4. Add evaporated milk and vanilla; mix until well blended, about 2 minutes.

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pumpkin cookies

5. Add flour mixture.

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pumpkin cookies

6. Mix until combined.

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pumpkin cookies

7. Scoop the cookie dough {1½-inch rounds} onto parchment-lined baking sheets, spacing about 2 inches apart.

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pumpkin cookies

8. Bake cookies about 11-12 minutes.  Let cool on sheets on wire racks.

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pumpkin cookies with brown-butter icing

Make icing:

1. Put confectioners’ sugar in a large bowl and set aside.

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pumpkin cookies

2. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat.  Cook, swirling pan occasionally, until golden brown, about 6-10 minutes.

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pumpkin cookies

3. Immediately add butter to confectioners’ sugar, scraping any browned bits from sides and bottom of pan.

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pumpkin cookies

4. Add evaporated milk and vanilla; whisk until smooth.

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pumpkin cookies

5. Spread about 1 teaspoon icing onto each cookie.  Cookies can be stored in single layers in airtight containers at room temperature up to 3 days.

Note:  If icing stiffens, stir in more evaporated milk, a little at a time.

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pumpkin cookies

Simple packaging for pumpkin cookies using cello bags, parchment paper, twine, and tags.

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pumpkin cookies

· print recipe, Pumpkin Cookies ·

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Posted by Kay

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Sharing and Cooking with Julia Child

julia child cookbooks

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As I was putting this blog post together my intention was to share a recipe from one of Julia Child’s cookbooks, but things don’t always go as planned.  I have expanded from one recipe to four and added some personal stories relating to Julia Child.  I hope you enjoy this blog post and maybe be inspired to try one of her recipes. Bon Appetit!

julia child-cookbooks-copper

My earliest introduction to Julia Child was during my childhood years.  My parents would tune to her television cooking shows on PBS and often times I was there to watch it with them. Having followed her over the years, I didn’t attempt to make anything she featured on her shows or from her cookbooks until my later years when I started to cook for Bill and I.  Early in our marriage, Bill noticed I was missing one particular cookbook and surprised me with a brand new copy of  Mastering the Art of French Cooking. The cookbook became my resource for basic cooking questions such as how to boil eggs, cook vegetables, and bake simple desserts. I can’t recall which particular recipe was my first attempt, but one I do remember well was trying to follow all the steps to the recipe on how to make the perfect scrambled eggs {oafs brouillés}. The recipe called for 8 eggs…I might have reduced the quantity by half for the two of us and I think it came out well and we ate it. I have expanded my repertoire since then, but there are still many more recipes that I look forward to trying.  Julia Child published her first cookbook in 1961 and her last book came out in 2006, My Life in France.  To see the entire collection of all her cookbooks, the Julia Child Foundation has on their website a page chronicling them all and when they were published.

· print recipe,  Scrambled Eggs ·

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Julia Child cookbooks

Can you guest as to who this might be?  This is a mini doll version of Julia Child from my daughter, Grace’s elementary school project from a few years ago.   Her teacher assigned the students to write about someone special,  who made the world a better place, and was an inspiration to others. Julia Child, was the person she picked for the project. Grace came to me and asked if I could help her make a doll to be a part of the presentation, and of course I said, “Yes.”  She drew a picture of how she wanted Julia to look and my part was to make it {easier said than done}.  I took some miscellaneous scraps of fabric/felt and other supplies we had around the house and used them to make the doll.  The pearl necklace was the last added touch.  That was how this little “Ms. Child” came into being.

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child - cookbooks

· print recipe, Roast Chicken ·

This delicious Roast Chicken recipe came from Julia Child’s most well known cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  This is a fairly simple recipe with a few important steps to follow during the 1½-2 hours of roasting.  Here I have decided to use a Vallauris casserole pot {an oven safe pan/deep dish will work as well} to roast a four pound chicken and the result was delicious.

Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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julia child-cookbooks-copper

 

Julia Child cookbooks

{Ruthie was holding her signed copy of the cookbook, From Julia Child’s Kitchen}

When the cookbook, From Julia Child’s Kitchen came out in 1975, Julia Child along with her husband, Paul Child began a cooking demonstration tour that started here in Seattle with stops in San Francisco and Honolulu.  My friend, Ruthie, had the privilege of attending one of the four classes that were held here in Seattle to benefit St. Mark’s Cathedral.  Julia Child didn’t just talk, but gave those who attended a wonderful cooking experience showcasing a wide range of dishes similar to the ones she demonstrated in San Francisco {Caneton en Aspic à la Parisienne and Charlotte Malakoff, Beef Wellington and Quiche aux Asperges, Le Loup en Croûte and Crêpes à la Pagode en Flammes}.  To end the evening, Ruthie went home with a signed copy of the cookbook as a reminder of the lovely time spent with Julia Child.

In an interview with The  New Yorker, Paul Child recalled, “In Seattle we performed in the auditorium of the cathedral, on a set put together mostly from found objects.  Somebody had contributed a stove, another person a refrigerator, and there were chests of drawers for work spaces and a couple of child-sized tables under the counters for shelves.  It was really very clever and workable, and it didn’t cost much.”

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

A mini tour of Ruthie’s Pantry where she kept her cookbooks, kitchen supplies, and her beautiful serving pieces.  To see her other kitchen pieces, click here.

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Julia Child cookbooks

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Julia Child cookbooks

julia child cookbooks-creme-fraiche

· print recipe, Crème Fraîche ·

From Julia Child’s Kitchen was the fourth cookbook published by Julia Child.  The recipes are easy to follow and could be read like a novel.  She would often accompany the recipes with such detail as to how to prepare and serve it, explain the reasons for certain techniques and methods and sometimes a little history was told. One of the recipes she included in the cookbook is crème fraîche.  It is a thick cream with a slight nutty flavor.  This cream is a versatile ingredient in French cooking to use in pasta sauce, cream soup, with fruit and vegetables, and to accompany desserts such as pies, tarts, and poached pears.

julia child cookbooks - creme fraiche

To make 1½ pints of crème fraîche, in a saucepan combine 1 cup of soured cream and 2 cups heavy cream, and stir to make a smooth blend.  Heat gently on medium heat to take off the chill and to start up the fermenting action.  Do not let the mixture temperature go over 85 degrees or you will kill the ferments.

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julia child-cookbooks-creme fraiche

Pour the liquid mixture into a container.

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julia child -cookbooks- creme fraiche

Set the container on the kitchen counter partially covered for 6 to 8 hours, or overnight, until the cream has thickened.

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julia child -cookbooks- creme fraiche

Stir the thick cream, cover, and refrigerate until ready to use.  It can be refrigerated for up to 1 week.

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julia child -cookbooks -creme fraiche

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Julia Child -cookbooks

· print recipe, Poached Pears ·

Poached Pears is a wonderful and simple dessert to make for this time of year. I discovered this recipe many years ago from the cookbook, Baking with Julia, and have enjoyed making it often.  I recently featured it on the blog along with the recipe, here.

Julia Child cookbooks

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recipe- poached pears

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julia child-cookbooks poached pears

A little dollop of crème fraîche or whipped cream will be a nice addition to this simple dessert.

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julia-child-cookbooks-pic2-5052-wh1000x1400-1

To see the entire collection of Julia Child’s cookbooks, click here.

· print recipe ·
Crème Fraîche
Poached Pears
Roast Chicken
Scrambled Eggs

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julia child-cookbooks-copper

Bon Appetit!

.t


Posted by Kay

1 comments

Spooky Halloween Treats

halloween spooky treats

Transform ordinary cookies, doughnuts, and cupcakes into something spooky and slightly creepy for Halloween.  Whether they are homemade or store bought treats, with the addition of little googly eyes will instantly turn them into little monsters and creatures that the kids will have fun eating. A little dab of royal icing onto the back of each one of these eyes will hold it in place.  These adorable candy eyes can be homemade with royal icing or purchased at the grocery stores or specialty stores. The royal icing recipe is available at the end of the blog post.

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Pear Muffins with Walnuts

pear muffins

Pears are in season and I’ve been serving up homemade Pear Muffins for breakfast.  For this particular recipe, I used Bartlett pears, but any other type of pear will be just as delicious.  It is especially nice to bake a batch of it during the weekends and enjoy it with the family.

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Pumpkin Picking and Decorating

pumpkins

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The farms are officially open for pumpkin picking.  Last weekend, Bill and I decided to go out for a drive and visit the nearby farms to see what they have for us this year.  The kids had other plans and wanted  to stay home and rest.  They will probably go with me at a later date to get their carving pumpkins.  It worked out great for us to have some time together on a little excursion even if it was just out looking for pumpkins. We had country music playing on the radio as we talked and had great conversations about things.  When we arrived at the farm, it was still early in the morning and the fields had not been disturbed. I could see the different colors scattered throughout the fields, and of course my eyes went directly to where the blue, gray, and white pumpkins were growing.  We had the whole field to ourselves.  Each pumpkin was just as beautiful as the next one.  I had the hardest time deciding which one to pick.  We walked through the fields and wondered back and forth many times.  After  two hours, our wheelbarrow was full.  It was a successful trip.   We came home with over 150 pounds of pumpkins in the back of the truck.  They were cleaned and trimmed of extra vines and leaves before I placed them inside the house.

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